7 reasons why you should start a corporate art collection

There is a reason why larger businesses have a corporate art collection. From financial benefits to marketing opportunities, art in the workplace can go a long way. 

Corporate art collections are hardly a new concept. It all started with banker and philanthropist David Rockefeller, the father of modern corporate art collecting. In the late 1950s, Rockefeller decided that longtime family-associated Chase Manhattan Bank should start acquiring art. 

Rockefeller began a trend where art transcended decoration and became a means of communication with the public. Today, the JPMorgan Chase Art collection is one of the oldest and largest corporate art collections in the world.

JP Morgan corporate art collection
J.P Morgan Chase Art Collection. Credit: Paris Photo

The list of financial institutions with an impressive corporate art collection also includes Deutsche Bank, UBS and Bank of America.

Why are such industry giants investing in corporate art? The reasons are manifold.

1. Investment in culture

Businesses may get involved in an art program by sponsoring or commissioning art. Companies can also organise art events to engage with new target audiences and get closer to customers and the community in general.

2. Strong company image

Art increases the corporate image among the public as well as its stakeholders. It conveys vision and drive. Having art, particularly modern art, implies a forward-thinking corporation with a positive attitude.

Duchy of Lancaster corporate art collection
Duchy of Lancaster, corporate art collection. Credit: Workplace Art

3. Boosting sales

 Companies that have art in the workplace are perceived as influential, sophisticated and trustworthy. To put it differently, a corporate art collection is bound to impress customers, which in turn, will lead to an increase in sales.

4. Business competitive advantage

Business companies, especially financial institutions like Deutsche Bank, can put their art knowledge to good use and offer art 'buy and sell' consultancy services to their customers.

microsoft art collection
Katz Frey, Microsoft Art Collection. Credit: Michael Klein Arts

5. Corporate hospitality

Art in the workplace lightens the mood. It creates a nice work environment, peppered with personality and, if the genre suits the business, humour.

6. Supporting the art community

By investing in art, whether it be local or international, companies are openly supporting the community. Businesses with limited budgets can start with the works of younger, less-established artists. Conversely, bigger companies can and should start big, then choose newer artists whose work points to the future.

Wall street company with corporate art collection
Sciame office, 14 Wall Street. Corporate art collection featuring artist Derek Fordjour. Photo via Real Art Muse

7. Enhanced productivity

Happier employees tend to be more productive and an increase in productivity can soon lead to an increase in profits. Having art in the workplace increases creativity and efficiency, making for an enhanced work environment.

According to a 2013 research by the British Council for Offices, 61% of workers agree that artwork inspires them to think and work more creatively.

Opening photo: Deutsche Bank, "Art Works"

Republic interviews Anna Rewinska from A:R

Anna Rewinska is a London based creative whose work is an interpretation of the energy and texture enclosed in music.

Since a very young age, Anna Rewinska has been interested in painting and drawing. She pursued this passion independently and through artistic education in both Poland and the UK at the London College of Communication. She also earned a BA (Hons) in Interior Architecture from the University of Brighton. 

The main focus of Anna’s artistic practice is visualizing music frequencies and the energy enclosed in the sound. She creates visual narratives that correspond to the atmosphere of electronic music vibrations. The mesmerizing impressions of music are the foundation for the development of quirky concepts which are transformed into large-scale murals.

Anna Rewinska currently lives and works in London as a Creative Director at Blue Drop Studio, a digital creative agency that she co-founded in 2015, and also continues her independent artistic ventures internationally.

R(love)ution limited edition giclee print by Anna Rewinska
R(love)ution, Limited edition of 30, giclee print, 41cm x 34cm.

Republic: Tell us a little bit about what inspires your work as an illustrator & street artist?

A:R: My biggest inspiration is music - the stories encapsulated in the sets. Music carries energy. It is a language understood by the soul, it creates a bond between people where no words are needed. Music also stimulates the brain more than any other form of art. It simply whispers to me countless ideas which then emerge as visual concepts.Aside from music, I draw inspiration from the world around me. Everything I see can trigger the creative process: colours, patterns, people, other amazing artists…

soundT/Wrap spray paint and acrylic on canvas
SoundT/Wrap, 2015, spray paint & acrylic on canvas, 90cm x 90cm. 

 Republic: Does your background in interior architecture influence your work as an illustrator & street artist and vice versa, has your passion for street art influenced your architectural designs?

A:R: My passion for art has definitely affected my architectural designs to some extent - in fact, my final project at university was about a perfect space for drawing & painting! Later on, my interest in spatial design definitely brought out the desire to use space as a canvas. Apart from street art, I would love to work on a vast branding project where digital illustration would be an important element to the brand and space would be considered as a canvas to bring fun and excitement!

handpainted mural at Shoreditch bar Apples and Pears
Bespoke murals executed within the space of a Shoreditch-based bar Apples & Pears, 2015. 

Republic: Urban graffiti used to have a negative connotation, often associated with vandalism, dark tunnels and subway cars. It is now more and more being recognised as a form of art that exudes personality, even indoors. What do you think changed?

A:R: This is a very good question. In fact, the last decade has brought big changes in many areas of our life - the world became an open place for free exchange of information and thoughts. Probably one of the most influential events that contributed to the transition of urban art was the 2008 Street Art Exhibition at the Tate Modern, where six internationally acclaimed artists from all over the world were invited to transform the river façade by creating breathtaking pieces, intricately linked to the urban environment

Individual_ness for Hackney Wicked
Individual_ness spray painted for Hackney Wicked, London, 2014

Republic: Can you tell us more about this transition and what graffiti and street art was like before?

A:R: Well, the Graffiti movement that flourished in the 70s was based on a territorial concept and only later evolved into a more elaborate form of art but I think it is safe to say it gave a permission to use the city as a canvas – whether it be with or without an actual permission. This concept of urban canvas is now employed in the street art movement. It is important to say that many urban artists now work on legal spots with a permission granted by the property holder.

Anna Rewinska at Emerging Music Frequencies in Mumbai, India
Filming the emerging music frequencies in Mumbai, India 

Republic: What is it, do you think, that drives urban artists to do what they do?

A:R: Urban artists are often also studio painters. They use the architectural fabric to extend their artistic reach and make art available for everyone, for free. Street art is an expression of freedom, an art form that rebels in a peaceful manner and reminds us of what is important in life or simply brings a smile on our faces. Currently, urban art is an extremely dynamic and evolving art discipline that grows within the city environment, an art discipline that consists of many mediums, from traditional freehand spray painting to paste-ups and even photography.

Apart from personal works created by artists or collectives, there is also plenty of socially-oriented projects that help communities and try to invigorate poorer neighbourhoods around the world. Those noble initiatives bring sunshine and hope to the young generation and help them believe, achieve and create.

Street art in Shoreditch, by Anna Rewinska
Street art piece in Shoreditch, Rivington Street, 2015.

Republic: So you are saying that street can have a clear impact on a social and economic level.  What about in the workplace? Do you think art can have an influence indoors?

A:R: Very much so. If the work environment is friendly and inspires everyday life, that will improve efficiency at work. It will also inspire new ideas and not exclusively within a creative environment – corporate businesses can benefit from it too.

Strawberry Mood spray paint and acrylic on canvas
Strawbery Mood, spray paint & acrylics on canvas, 50cm x 50cm, 2016. Also available as limited edition giclee print at Well Hung gallery in Hoxton, London.

Republic: Workplace and graffiti art are slowly starting to coexist. Why do you think that is and how can offices benefit from that?

A:R: That is very true. More and more companies, even industry giants are bringing this form of art indoors. I had the pleasure to work on a huge, site-specific mural for Just Eat (12m long!) in their shared leisure space. I think it definitely injects uniqueness, originality and expression of self that, in turn, might resonate with the workforce and improve not only their efficiency but also their mood.

Catcher in the Rhythm limited edition
Catcher in the Rhythm 2, 2015. Limited edition of 30, giclee print, 44cm x 83cm.

Republic: Do you believe graffiti or street art can help build a company's brand or is it purely an aesthetic feature?

A:R: As every tool, if used wisely, it can have many benefits and help connect with a younger target audience. It would be very effective for companies looking for creative ways to communicate and sometimes even interact with people throughout the city.

Personally, I think it is such a great, versatile medium that comes in so many shapes, forms and styles that it can help spread brand awareness and also bring a lot of interest. Unfortunately, opinions are divided: employing street art in a brand campaign might, in fact, clash with the philosophy behind it because it remains a free form of expression. So instead of using graffiti as a selling point, a company can benefit from associations commonly made to the movement. Not to mention, street artists create a brand of their own.

Anna Rewinska from A:R

Artists like Anna Rewinska are the reason why we love collaborating with artisans and creative minds. If you would like to incorporate one of Anna's paintings in your next Re:public project then get in touch - we'll be glad to meet over coffee.

In the meantime, you can follow Anna on FacebookInstagram and Twitter